Dr. Terry Takes the Ice Bucket Challenge for ALS Awareness

Northwestern Medicine
Neurosciences August 12, 2014
If you're on social media, then you've likely seen videos of friends, family and even celebrities dumping buckets of ice water over their heads. The "Ice Bucket Challenge" aims to raise awareness of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), a degenerative disease that affects motor neurons. This viral campaign has raised millions in donations for the ALS Association* and it continues to pick up steam. Participants who complete the challenge must also nominate someone else to take the "Ice Bucket Challenge" in their video. 

Northwestern Medicine's Dr. Michael Terry was challenged in Chicago Blackhawks* Head Coach Joel Quenneville's video.* Dr. Terry, an orthopaedic surgeon at Northwestern, is the head team physician for the Blackhawks. He quickly accepted Coach Q's challenge and nominated his Northwestern Medicine colleague Dr. Stephen Gryzlo, an orthopaedic surgeon who is a team physician for the Chicago Cubs,* Coach Pat Fitzgerald* of Northwestern University Football, and Dr. Brian Cole, the head team physician for the Chicago Bulls.* Will they accept his challenge?



According the the Les Turner ALS Foundation,* which funds research and a specialized clinic at Northwestern Medicine, more than 5,600 Americans are diagnosed with ALS each year. Approximately 35,000 people at any given time are living with ALS in the United States. In ALS, motor neurons gradually cease functioning and die. As this happens, the muscle tissues waste away because no movement is being stimulated. This results in gradually worsening muscle weakness, atrophy and often spasticity. Only the motor neurons are affected. Other nerve cells, such as sensory neurons that bring information from sense organs to the brain, remain healthy. 

Learn more about ALS and the specialized care and research offered at Northwestern.

View more Northwestern Medicine "Ice Bucket Challenge" videos here

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