Mobile Health Unit Provides Wellness Services

Wellness on the Move

Mobile Health Unit Provides Wellness Services

As part of our commitment to the health and wellness of McHenry County and the entire northern Illinois/southern Wisconsin region, Northwestern Medicine offers the Wellness on the Move mobile health unit. Donated by the Northwestern Medicine HospitalMcHenry Auxiliary, Wellness on the Move provides screenings for prevention and early detection of a range of conditions, from cardiovascular disease to stroke.

The mobile health unit travels to schools, health fairs, corporations, senior communities and areas of McHenry and Kane Counties with under-served populations.

If you’d like to schedule Wellness on the Move for a community event or program, call our Mobile Health Unit Coordinator at 815.788.2269 for more information.

Employers interested in Wellness on the Move for on-site employee screenings should call 815.788.2269 or visit Worksite Wellness to learn more. 

Wellness on the Move Screenings

This screening includes the Advanced Screening Package plus measures c-reactive protein levels to detect inflammation and measures men’s prostate specific antigen or women’s thyroid hormone level.

  • Prostate-Specific Antigen test (PSA) – Men only (blood draw)

A Prostate-Specific Antigen (PSA) blood test measures the amount of PSA in a man’s blood. PSA levels normally increase as a man ages, but a higher-than-normal level can be one clue that cancer has developed in the prostate gland. High levels of PSA can also be found as a result of other non-cancerous conditions, including prostatitis (inflammation of the prostate) and benign prostatic hyperplasia (an enlargement of the prostate that affects many older men).

  • Thyroid Stimulating Hormone test (TSH) – Women only (blood draw)

The Thyroid Stimulating Hormone (TSH) is secreted by the pituitary gland and regulates the thyroid gland. Thyroid hormones influence virtually every organ system in the body. They tell organs how fast or slow they should work, they regulate the consumption of oxygen and the production of heat and they regulate our body’s metabolism. Thyroid disease occurs when the thyroid gland doesn’t supply the proper amount of hormones needed by the body. If the thyroid is overactive, it releases too much thyroid hormone into the bloodstream (hyperthyroidism). An underactive thyroid produces too little thyroid hormone (hypothyroidism).

  • High-Sensitivity C-Reactive Protein (hs-CRP) test

This is an assay used to help predict a healthy person’s risk of cardiovascular diseases. The CRP molecule itself is not harmful; the higher level of CRP is simply a reflection of higher than normal inflammation. People who have hs-CRP results in the high end of the normal range have 1.5 to 4 times the risk of having a heart attach as compared with those who have CRP values at the low end of the normal range. Any recent illness, tissue injury, infection or general inflammation will raise the amount of CRP and give a falsely elevated estimate of risk.

  • Echocardiogram
  • Electrocardiogram (EKG)
  • Hardening of the arteries test (ASI)
  • Stroke/carotid artery ultrasound
  • Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm (AAA) ultrasound
  • Peripheral Artery Disease test (PAD)
  • Health Risk Assessment (HRA)
  • Full lipid panel – (12-hour fasting blood draw)

Measures the following: Total cholesterol. Cholesterol is a fat like substance in the blood. High cholesterol is a major risk factor for heart and blood vessel disease. Cholesterol in itself is not all bad; in fact, our bodies need a certain amount to function properly. However, when the level gets too high, vascular disease can result (i.e., atherosclerosis or “hardening of the arteries”), which can cause a heart attack or stroke. Triglycerides. Triglycerides are a type of fat in the blood which, if elevated, have been associated with heart disease and/or pancreatitis. It is a type of blood fat largely derived from dietary fat absorption. High Density Lipoprotein (HDL) Cholesterol. HDL is considered “good cholesterol,” as it protects against heart disease by helping remove excess cholesterol deposited in the arteries. Low Density Lipoprotein (LDL) Cholesterol. LDL is considered “bad cholesterol” because cholesterol deposits in the arteries when LDL levels are high.

  • Diabetes test (glucose) – (12-hour fasting blood draw)

This is a measure of the sugar level in your blood and is the chief source of energy for all living organisms. High values may be associated with eating before the test and diabetes. Low blood glucose levels may be seen with some tumors or liver disease.

  • BMI, weight, and blood pressure

This screening includes the Basic Screening Package plus blood tests to measure cholesterol, triglycerides and blood sugar levels.

  • Echocardiogram
  • Electrocardiogram (EKG)
  • Hardening of the arteries test (ASI)
  • Stroke/carotid artery ultrasound
  • Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm (AAA) ultrasound
  • Peripheral Artery Disease test (PAD)
  • Health Risk Assessment (HRA)
  • Full lipid panel – measures cholesterol levels and triglycerides. This is a fasting blood draw (12 hours).
  • Diabetes test (glucose) – measures the amount of sugar in your blood. This is a fasting blood draw (12 hours).
  •  BMI, weight & blood pressure

This screening includes the ECHO Screening Package plus detects for aneurysms and plaque build up in your arteries.

  • Echocardiogram
  • Electrocardiogram (EKG)
  • Hardening of the arteries test (ASI)
  • Stroke/carotid artery ultrasound
  • Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm (AAA) ultrasound
  • Peripheral Artery Disease test (PAD)

This screening detects heart defects and abnormalities and measures Body Mass Index, pulse and blood pressure.

  • Echocardiogram
  • BMI, pulse, and blood pressure

Every 45 seconds, someone has a stroke. Find out if you are at risk with a vascular screening. The Northwestern Medicine Wellness on the Move mobile health unit offers a comprehensive vascular screening package to check your risk for stroke and heart disease, and provides you with immediate, confidential results including:

  • Electrocardiogram (EKG)
  • Stroke/carotid artery ultrasound
  • Ankle Brachial Index (ABI)
  • Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm (AAA) ultrasound
  • Peripheral Arterial Disease (PAD)
  • BMI, pulse, and blood pressure

Many active teenagers do not show symptoms of heart abnormalities, yet they could still be at risk for cardiac arrest or even death. Many cases of sudden cardiac death in teenagers, especially ages 13 to 18, can be prevented with a proper heart screening. The Northwestern Medicine Wellness on the Move mobile health unit offers echocardiogram (ECHO) heart screenings designed for teenagers. This screening is an ultrasound of the heart and can help detect heart defects and abnormalities, even when no symptoms are present. Teen ECHO screenings include an echocardiogram. You can find out more details on Teen ECHO screenings here.