Overview

What Are Keloids?

Keloids are abnormal scar formations that create firm, raised, fibrous skin growths on the sites of wounds or skin irritation. Keloids are made of collagen (a protein) produced by the body as a wound heals. Sometimes they don't appear until up to a year after the original wound heals.

Although keloids are benign (non-cancerous), they can be difficult to treat and often grow back after removal. They do not, however, turn into cancer.

Keloids are more common in dark-skinned people, particularly African-Americans. They can appear anywhere, but are most common on the chest, neck, shoulders, back and earlobes. They can be less than an inch to a foot long.

Keloids can be large and noticeable, so they can have a negative impact on a person’s self-confidence.

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