Low-Vision Treatments

If you have permanently reduced vision as a result of eye disease, you may find it difficult or impossible to perform everyday tasks such as reading or watching TV. You may be a candidate for low-vision rehabilitation services to maximize your visual performance for optimal daily activities. This rehabilitation is also appropriate if you have moderate vision loss that’s significantly affecting your daily functions.

Low-vision treatments include:

  • Video magnification systems
  • Text-to-speech devices
  • Telescopic systems
  • Microscopic systems
  • Spectacle-mounted magnification systems
  • Handheld and illuminated magnification systems
  • Computer-assisted magnification systems
  • Light filters
  • Prismatic optical systems
  • Non-optical assistive low-vision devices

Our low-vision rehabilitation specialists1 will perform an in-depth low-vision evaluation and consultation. During this visit they will comprehensively evaluate your visual function status to determine which technologies and devices will help you with tasks and maximize your remaining visual potential.

You’ll receive training in the use of the devices prescribed, as well as after-care visits to ensure you’re achieving your goals. Periodic monitoring visits will also be performed to adjust treatment for any potential changes in your visual status.

Low-vision rehabilitation often lets you once again perform daily living tasks and functions you thought might no longer be possible.

Low-vision services are provided through a collaboration between Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine and the Chicago Lighthouse.2

Conditions that this treatment is offered for:

Legal Information
1

In the spirit of keeping you well-informed, some of the physician(s) and/or individual(s) identified are neither agents nor employees of Northwestern Memorial HealthCare or any of its affiliate organizations. They have selected our facilities as places where they want to treat and care for their private patients.

2

By clicking on these websites, you are leaving the Northwestern Medicine website. These websites are independent resources. Northwestern Medicine does not operate or control the content of these websites. By visiting these websites, you agree to this third party’s terms of use for their website.