Symptoms

Symptoms of Pediatric Cancers

Childhood cancer is not always easy to detect. Symptoms of cancer are often similar to symptoms of other conditions. Some children don't have any symptoms of cancer until the disease is well advanced.

Although each type of cancer has its own specific symptoms, The Pediatric Oncology Resource Center* developed a list of general symptoms using the acronym CHILD CANCER:

  • Continued, unexplained weight loss
  • Headaches, often with early morning vomiting
  • Increased swelling or persistent pain in the bones, joints, back or legs
  • Lump or mass, especially in the abdomen, neck, chest, pelvis or armpits
  • Development of excessive bruising, bleeding or rash
  • Constant, frequent or persistent infections
  • A whitish color behind the pupil
  • Nausea that persists or vomiting without nausea
  • Constant tiredness or noticeable paleness
  • Eye or vision changes that occur suddenly and persist
  • Recurring or persistent fevers of unknown origin

Talk to your physician if your child is experiencing any of the above symptoms.

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