Overview

What Is Ménière's Disease?

Ménière's Disease is an inner ear disorder that’s accompanied by dizziness, hearing loss, tinnitus (ringing, hissing or roaring in the ears) and a sensation of fullness.

Ménière's Disease is a lifelong, chronic condition that usually strikes between ages 20 and 50, but is most common in the 40s and 50s. The National Institutes of Health estimate that about 615,000 Americans have Ménière's Disease and about 45,500 new cases are diagnosed each year.

There are currently no risk factors identified or cure for Ménière's Disease.

This condition may get progressively worse over time, leading to hearing loss and episodes of severe dizziness that can interfere with work, driving and daily activities. Some people with Ménière's Disease may also suffer from depression and anxiety because of the symptoms associated with this condition.




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