Excluding cancers of the skin, prostate cancer is the most common cancer and the second-leading cause of cancer death in the United States.  Most of the time prostate cancer is detected before a man develops symptoms, with approximately 85% of prostate cancers detected by abnormalities in either bloodwork (PSA screening test) or by rectal exam.

Expert groups agree that routine screening for prostate cancer can help detect the disease at an early stage. When to begin screening depends on one’s risk of prostate cancer, which is influenced by a combination of factors including age, family history, race, and lifestyle.  It is important that men discuss the test with their doctor to develop a screening plan tailored to their individual risk.  

If you do not have a physician, you may request to schedule an appointment with one of our prostate cancer specialists by calling 312.695.8146 or visit urology.nm.org

About the Northwestern Medicine Department of Urology

Our urology program at Northwestern Memorial Hospital offers the latest treatment options for patients in all stages of prostate cancer. Our world-renowned team of experts evaluates the severity of prostate cancer and provides state-of-the-art treatment to improve function, enhance quality of life and improve survival.

Leading the Department of Urology is internationally-recognized physician-scientist Edward M. Schaeffer, MD, PhD.   Dr. Schaeffer’s discoveries have greatly advanced the basic scientific understanding of prostate cancer and clinical care pathways. 

Dr. Schaeffer joins an outstanding team of scientists, clinicians and urologic oncologists with significant expertise in bladder, kidney and testicular cancer. Offering experience of up to 40 years, our urologists also provide specialized urological care to patients with benign conditions, including kidney stones, stricture disease, urologic trauma, benign prostatic hyperplasia, male infertility, sexual dysfunction, infections, inflammation, incontinence and congenital urologic disorders in adulthood.

Second Opinions

A second opinion can drastically alter your treatment options. Our urologists are available for second opinion consultation on your medical and surgical treatment options for all urologic conditions. For more information, please call 312.695.8146 or visit urology.nm.org.

The Truth About the Most Common Cancer in Men

Prostate cancer develops in the prostate, the golf ball-sized gland that’s located below a man’s bladder. The prostate makes the thick fluid that’s part of semen and plays an important role in sexual function.

Prostate cancer is the most common non-skin cancer in men, affecting one in seven men in their lifetime. Although prostate cancer is quite common, it often does not cause local symptoms. Only if the cancer progresses beyond the prostate, into advanced stages, will men experience symptoms. Prostate cancer can be detected through screening tests. The first step is to have an open dialogue with your physician to see if prostate cancer screening is appropriate.

“Although prostate cancer is the most common cancer in men, there are great ways to detect it at a curable stage. When to begin screening depends on one’s risk of prostate cancer, which is influenced by a combination of factors including age, family history, race, and lifestyle,” says the Chair of the Department of Urology Edward, Schaeffer, MD, PhD. “I encourage all men to discuss the test with their doctor to develop a screening plan tailored to their individual risk.”

Prevention begins with understanding prostate cancer. Here are some common myths – and facts.


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Related Resources

General Prostate Cancer Resources

Prostate Cancer Foundation

Find an Expert Near You

National Cancer Institute Designated Centers of Excellence
National Comprehensive Cancer Center Network Member Institutions
National Cancer Institute-Supported Trials

Learn More About Prostate Cancer Screening

American Urological Association’s Guidelines on Prostate Cancer Screening
American Cancer Society on Prostate Cancer Screening